“The right to life is the belief that a being has the right to life and, in particular, must not be killed by another entity” – The Observer

by John Grimaldi

WASHINGTON, DC – In a new episode of AMAC’s Better for America podcast, host Rebecca Weber, CEO of the Association of Mature American Citizens, is joined by two colleagues in an extensive discussion about abortion. They are Alexa Abela, associate editor of AMAC magazine, and Bob Chartuk, financial planner at the Association.

In the first part of the podcast, Rebecca asked Alexa about her perspective, as a 23-year-old woman, on the issue of abortion.

His answer: It’s about “not having faith in God and having this self-centered idea of ​​yourself… [to those who have a pro-choice viewpoint]. It’s like they don’t realize it’s a child inside of them. It’s a disconnect. It’s just selfish. The left says ‘It’s my choice! This is my body!’ It’s not your body. You are now sharing your body. You share your womb with another human being. You are still a mother. It doesn’t matter if you give birth to this child, you are still a mother. Your hormones change, your endorphins change. Your body is preparing you as a mother. And you won’t see the left acknowledging that. And you don’t see enough people talking about it. They don’t want to talk about the trauma that comes with abortion. There are so many articles I’ve seen about people – women coming out and saying that Planned Parenthood, which is government funded, forced them to have abortions. I mean, how many stories do you hear of doctors convincing people to have abortions for selfish reasons because your life is going to be harder.

When Bob joined the discussion, he revealed a personal “what if” story.

We’ve all heard stories about the mother who gave birth only to find her newborn son or daughter has Down Syndrome. There are those who are quick to say that she should have had an abortion for herself and for the good of the child. Or they’ll say get tested. But, as the Centers for Disease Control [CDC] “Screening tests do not provide an absolute diagnosis.”

One day Bob noticed a lump in his wife’s stomach. “We went to the doctor and it turned out to be an ovarian cyst the size of a tennis ball. The doctor wanted to remove it with a full hysterectomy,” he said. He said. It was not an option for him and his wife; They wanted a baby and so they wanted to find an alternative. The doctor proposed a “risky” procedure. But, leafing through medical magazines in the bathroom waiting for the doctor, he came across a potentially safer option. He and his wife discussed it with their doctor, who agreed that it was indeed a way to remove the cyst without having to remove his reproductive organs and they therefore made arrangements to undergo the procedure.

“Lo and behold, the cyst began to shrink to the point where it could be safely removed.” It worked. The cyst was removed. And “a few months later my wife was pregnant and we were about to have a child.” But two months into her pregnancy, there was another hurdle to overcome. The tests showed that “the child would be a baby with Down syndrome.

Their doctor suggested that “the best option would probably be to have an abortion. She told us, “You don’t really want to deliver a child, you know, with birth defects. And I have to say there was a lot of pressure at that time to end the pregnancy, but there was no way we were going to do it.

They had a baby girl and “we kept an eye on her. We never went back to the Down Syndrome Support Group,” Bob said. “Our daughter started to develop and we kind of kept an eye on her and then we realized she didn’t seem like a child with Down syndrome. So we took her to get tested, and voila, she She wasn’t, and today she’s entering her second year as a math and physics major.

Abortion advocates might say that Mr. and Mrs. Chartuk just got lucky, but that’s beside the point. Life is sacred, whether a baby is a boy or a girl, has blue or brown eyes, has Down syndrome, or is a healthy son or daughter. They have the right to life.

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