Mosaic down syndrome – Nova Scotia Down Syndrome Society http://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 23:53:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T230350.091.png Mosaic down syndrome – Nova Scotia Down Syndrome Society http://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/ 32 32 A mysterious disease is reached https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/a-mysterious-disease-is-reached/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 20:32:42 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/a-mysterious-disease-is-reached/ No one knows exactly what causes the many far-reaching symptoms, but one thing is for sure: American officials around the world have fallen ill for inexplicable reasons. It started in 2016 at the United States Embassy in Havana, Cuba. Since then, more than 200 U.S. officials have served in China, Russia, Austria, and the United […]]]>

No one knows exactly what causes the many far-reaching symptoms, but one thing is for sure:

American officials around the world have fallen ill for inexplicable reasons.

It started in 2016 at the United States Embassy in Havana, Cuba. Since then, more than 200 U.S. officials have served in China, Russia, Austria, and the United States, among other countries, she has been diagnosed with Havana Syndrome.

Now, the police in the German capital have also opened an investigation after several employees of the American embassy in Berlin fell ill. BBC reports.

mysterious: Chinese authorities have released a video captured from its Zhurong space probe. The footage is from the landing and in this clip we can also hear some mysterious sounds from the planet. Reporter: Maja Walberg Cliff. Video: AP

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“Suspected attack”

The BBC wrote that the investigation in Germany has been ongoing since August.

Berlin police said in a statement they were investigating the case as a “suspected attack”, and wrote that they were investigating whether a “sonic weapon” had been used.

Mysterious syndrome: – double the effort

Vocal sound is high frequency sound, and one of the main theories has always been that Havana Syndrome can be caused by vocal attacks. Another major theory is that the syndrome can be caused by targeted microwaves.

Some patients have been diagnosed with brain damage. Others have reported hearing loss, dizziness, trouble sleeping, headaches, and cognitive impairment.

US President Joe Biden on Friday vowed – again – that US authorities would find the bottom of the puzzle, according to the BBC.

The answer was found: Scientists believe they have solved the mystery of why the Golden Gate Bridge suddenly started making strange sounds. Video: Journalist: Vigard Krueger
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CIA chief removed from office

Most cases of Havana Syndrome are recorded in Vienna, which has been a known hunt for intelligence officers from many countries for years.

The city is home to, among other things, the headquarters of many United Nations organizations, as well as many international organizations that have information of interest to a number of countries.

Illness rates are staggering

in the United States of America The head of the Austrian CIA was dismissed from his post at the end of September for not having reacted strongly enough after several cases of Havana syndrome in Vienna.

About half of the 200 people who believe they have developed Havana Syndrome are CIA officers or family members of CIA officers.

This is why CIA Director William Burns suggested that Russia could be behind this. Burns did not prove her claims and Russia stubbornly claims that she did not support them.

Unexplained sounds: Researchers have been studying radio signals from space for several years, but have not been able to fully understand their source. Video: CNN
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Teacher: – Very simple

NTNU’s Professor Emeritus Jens Martin Hoffem, an expert in sound and acoustics, previously told Dagbladet that if the damage is caused by high-frequency sound, it can simply be transmitted through an ordinary speaker.

– The sound can come from a loudspeaker which can measure up to several square meters and operate at a very high frequency. This is a design problem, not a goal.

According to Hovem, it is not particularly difficult to direct the sound towards a single person or a single building. It depends on the design of the enclosure.

New cases of a mysterious syndrome

New cases of a mysterious syndrome

Think of a radar antenna: a circular disc with a mosaic of ceramic tiles, but instead of sending electromagnetic radiation, it oscillates the mosaic at any high frequency, Hovim explains.

There is no doubt that one can be affected by sound – all kinds of sounds.

Sound affects all of life in one way or another, such as noise that annoys people, or through communication over long distances. The fact that you cannot hear the sound does not necessarily mean that the sound does not exist. In any case, the sound is a mechanical vibration and high frequency sounds can be harmful.


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“Genetic Testing of IVF to Prevent Birth Defects in Older Women” https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/genetic-testing-of-ivf-to-prevent-birth-defects-in-older-women/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 19:38:26 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/genetic-testing-of-ivf-to-prevent-birth-defects-in-older-women/ “Is it worth doing genetic testing for IVF (PGS / PGT-A) to prevent birth defects in older women?” », Explains Dr Alexis Heng Boon Chin, Associate Professor, Peking University, China With an increasing trend towards late motherhood, many women in Asia and around the world are choosing to postpone motherhood while prioritizing their lifestyle and […]]]>

“Is it worth doing genetic testing for IVF (PGS / PGT-A) to prevent birth defects in older women?” », Explains Dr Alexis Heng Boon Chin, Associate Professor, Peking University, China

With an increasing trend towards late motherhood, many women in Asia and around the world are choosing to postpone motherhood while prioritizing their lifestyle and career goals. However, the chances of conceiving a baby with genetic (chromosomal) abnormalities increase with maternal age, the most common and well-known being Down syndrome. Globally, more than 90% of fetuses with Down syndrome are systematically aborted after a positive diagnosis by prenatal test. However, there are serious risks to the mental, physical and reproductive health of the patient to be aware of when having an abortion of a fetus diagnosed with Down syndrome or other genetic abnormalities.

For older women undergoing assisted reproduction treatment, there is a way to avoid this abortion quagmire by genetic testing of IVF embryos before they are transferred to the uterus, a very expensive procedure known as preimplantation genetic testing – Aneuploidy (PGT-A) or preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). Therefore, the relevant question for older women undergoing assisted reproduction treatment is whether it is useful and cost effective to use expensive PGT-A (PGS) for the screening and exclusion of genetically embryos. abnormal, compared to standard prenatal testing techniques which are much cheaper.

Dr Alexis Heng Boon Chin, Associate Professor, Peking University, China share more ideas in this perspective with Biospectrum Asia.

What are the different types of genetic abnormalities that occur in older mothers?

Due to a lack of proper separation of chromosomes during egg development in older women, they are at a higher risk of genetically abnormal births.

The most common genetic defect in older mothers is Down syndrome, caused by an extra copy of chromosome 21. In addition, increasing maternal age is also associated with high risks of Edwards syndrome. (extra copy of chromosome 18), Patau syndrome (extra copy of chromosome 18). 13) and Klinefelter syndrome (extra X chromosome – 47, XXY). Of these, only babies with Down and Klinefelter syndromes usually survive to adulthood. Patau’s syndrome life expectancy is around 7-10 days, with 90% dying within the first year of life.

Likewise, the average lifespan for Edwards syndrome is 3 days to 2 weeks, with only 5% to 10% of affected infants surviving more than a year. Down syndrome is characterized by a substantial reduction in lifespan up to about 60 years, severe impairment of mental and physical development, as well as an increased predisposition to certain medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, diabetes. type II and Alzheimer’s disease (after the age of 40). In contrast, for Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY), there is only a very slight reduction in lifespan of about 2 years compared to the normal male population (46, XY). Although people with Klinefelter syndrome generally have normal intelligence, they suffer from infertility and have small underdeveloped male sex organs, poor motor coordination and weak muscles, reduced facial and body hair, breast growth. and low libido.

According to published medical statistics, the chances of conceiving a genetically abnormal baby for women in their late thirties, between the ages of 37 and 39, are approximately 0.8% to 1.2%. At age 40, the risk of genetic abnormalities increases to about 1.5%, then to about 4.8% at age 45.

Can genetic testing potentially harm IVF embryos?

Genetic testing for IVF involves drilling a hole in the shell of the embryo (Pellucide Zone) and extract cells from the embryo, which is potentially harmful and may interfere with its development. Experts pointed out that studies claiming that there were no harmful effects on embryos are often based on PGS of high-quality, healthy and robust embryos rather than on more “delicate” embryos which could suffer more. If you only have one or two embryos, you might decide it’s not worth the risk. No matter how well trained the laboratory staff (embryologist) in this procedure, there is always a risk of human error. The busier the IVF lab, the greater the risk of human error, as lab staff are under pressure to complete procedures as quickly as possible.

What are the challenges associated with genetic testing for IVF?

There are several aspects to consider for genetic testing in the treatment of IVF.

  • Genetic IVF testing involves extracting and removing cells from the outer layer of the embryo that gives rise to the placenta and umbilical cord. It is not representative of the inner layer of the embryo which forms the actual embryo, which gives birth to the baby.
  • Mosaic embryos, which are embryos with a mixture of genetically normal and abnormal cells, occur quite frequently and commonly in women undergoing IVF. Genetic testing often leads to the misdiagnosis and elimination of mosaic embryos, which have been shown to be able to give birth to a normal, healthy baby. Recently, in 2020, a class action lawsuit was filed by Australian patients against a misdiagnosis by genetic IVF testing, which led to the disposal of their viable embryos and a consequent loss of chance of parenthood.
  • There is scientific evidence that Mosaic embryos are able to self-correct, which increases the chances of a normal birth. This “self-correction” mechanism involves expelling genetically abnormal cells into the outer layer of the embryo, resulting in the placenta and umbilical cord.
  • Older women with low ovarian reserves have significantly fewer embryos during IVF. Therefore, excluding or rejecting mosaic embryos that could potentially give birth to a normal baby would in fact greatly reduce their chances of successful IVF. Some older women may not have more embryos to transfer after genetic testing.

Are there alternative methods to genetic IVF testing to prevent birth defects in older women?

Yes, there is a much cheaper alternative method than PGT-A (PGS). This is called the non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT), in which DNA from fetal cells in the pregnant woman’s bloodstream is extracted and tested for genetic abnormalities. However, the downside is that NIPT can only be performed after pregnancy, so the patient must be mentally and emotionally prepared to abort a genetically abnormal fetus. Additionally, ultrasound can also be used to some extent to detect Down syndrome, although the results are not as precise and conclusive as NIPT.

What is the Cost-Effectiveness of Genetic IVF Testing for Older Women?

In view of the uncertain results and the high costs of IVF treatment, it may be preferable for some patients with limited funds to reduce costs by not doing genetic tests, in order to save money for future IVF attempts. IVF treatment, as cheaper alternative prenatal testing methods are available. After all, more than one IVF attempt is usually needed to achieve reproductive success, and it would be financially draining to do genetic testing for each cycle of IVF treatment. As mentioned earlier, since the risks of genetic abnormalities do not exceed 5% during most of the reproductive lifespan of women (20 to 45 years), it can be very unprofitable to use such an expensive procedure for all. older women undergoing IVF. In particular, the incidence of genetic abnormalities is generally less than 1.5% for women under 40, so the use of PGT-A would be unnecessary more than 98.5% of the time. Ultimately, it is up to patients with limited financial resources to decide whether it is worth taking a calculated risk of avoiding very expensive genetic testing, to get more IVF vaccines.

Can you clarify the principles and regulations of genetic testing for IVF in Singapore?

Singapore’s health policies allow genetic testing for IVF only for the traditional clinical treatment of patients with or carriers of known genetic diseases (PGT-M and PGT-SR). Routine genetic screening of older female IVF embryos (PGS or PGT-A), who are at increased risk for Down syndrome, is still not approved as general clinical treatment, but is limited to a strictly clinical trial. regulated in public hospitals. To participate in this clinical trial, women must be 35 years of age or older, or have suffered two repeated miscarriages, or have two unsuccessful IVF attempts. In addition, there are insufficient and questionable results from the ongoing clinical trial of genetic IVF testing in Singapore, which reportedly suffered from a high attrition rate of 72%.

Hihaishi C Bhaskar

hithaishicb@mmactiv.com


Source link

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“Genetic Testing of IVF to Prevent Birth Defects in Older Women” https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/genetic-testing-of-ivf-to-prevent-birth-defects-in-older-women-2/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 15:45:00 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/genetic-testing-of-ivf-to-prevent-birth-defects-in-older-women-2/ “Is it worth doing genetic testing for IVF (PGS / PGT-A) to prevent birth defects in older women?” », Explains Dr Alexis Heng Boon Chin, Associate Professor, Peking University, China With an increasing trend towards late motherhood, many women in Asia and around the world are choosing to postpone motherhood while prioritizing their lifestyle and […]]]>

“Is it worth doing genetic testing for IVF (PGS / PGT-A) to prevent birth defects in older women?” », Explains Dr Alexis Heng Boon Chin, Associate Professor, Peking University, China

With an increasing trend towards late motherhood, many women in Asia and around the world are choosing to postpone motherhood while prioritizing their lifestyle and career goals. However, the chances of conceiving a baby with genetic (chromosomal) abnormalities increase with maternal age, the most common and well-known being Down syndrome. Globally, more than 90% of fetuses with Down syndrome are systematically aborted after a positive diagnosis by prenatal test. However, there are serious risks to the mental, physical and reproductive health of the patient to be aware of when having an abortion of a fetus diagnosed with Down syndrome or other genetic abnormalities.

For older women undergoing assisted reproduction treatment, there is a way to avoid this abortion quagmire by genetic testing of IVF embryos before they are transferred to the uterus, a very expensive procedure known as preimplantation genetic testing – Aneuploidy (PGT-A) or preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). Therefore, the relevant question for older women undergoing assisted reproduction treatment is whether it is useful and cost effective to use expensive PGT-A (PGS) for the screening and exclusion of genetically embryos. abnormal, compared to standard prenatal testing techniques which are much cheaper.

Dr Alexis Heng Boon Chin, Associate Professor, Peking University, China share more ideas in this perspective with Biospectrum Asia.

What are the different types of genetic abnormalities that occur in older mothers?

Due to a lack of proper chromosome separation during egg development in older women, they are at a higher risk of genetically abnormal births.

The most common genetic defect in older mothers is Down syndrome, caused by an extra copy of chromosome 21. In addition, increasing maternal age is also associated with high risks of Edwards syndrome. (extra copy of chromosome 18), Patau syndrome (extra copy of chromosome 18). 13) and Klinefelter syndrome (extra X chromosome – 47, XXY). Of these, only babies with Down and Klinefelter syndromes usually survive to adulthood. Patau’s syndrome life expectancy is around 7-10 days, with 90% dying within the first year of life.

Likewise, the average lifespan for Edwards syndrome is 3 days to 2 weeks, with only 5% to 10% of affected infants surviving more than a year. Down syndrome is characterized by a substantial reduction in lifespan up to about 60 years, severe impairment of mental and physical development, as well as an increased predisposition to certain medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, diabetes. type II and Alzheimer’s disease (after the age of 40). In contrast, for Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY), there is only a very slight reduction in lifespan of about 2 years compared to the normal male population (46, XY). Although people with Klinefelter syndrome generally have normal intelligence, they suffer from infertility and have small underdeveloped male sex organs, poor motor coordination and weak muscles, reduced facial and body hair, breast growth. and low libido.

According to published medical statistics, the chances of conceiving a genetically abnormal baby for women in their late thirties, between the ages of 37 and 39, are approximately 0.8% to 1.2%. At age 40, the risk of genetic abnormalities increases to about 1.5%, then to about 4.8% at age 45.

Can genetic testing potentially harm IVF embryos?

Genetic testing for IVF involves drilling a hole in the shell of the embryo (Pellucide Zone) and extract cells from the embryo, which is potentially harmful and may interfere with its development. Experts pointed out that studies claiming that there were no harmful effects on embryos are often based on PGS of high-quality, healthy and robust embryos rather than on more “delicate” embryos which could suffer more. If you only have one or two embryos, you might decide it’s not worth the risk. No matter how well trained the laboratory staff (embryologist) in this procedure, there is always a risk of human error. The busier the IVF lab, the greater the risk of human error, as lab staff are under pressure to complete procedures as quickly as possible.

What are the challenges associated with genetic testing for IVF?

There are several aspects to consider for genetic testing in the treatment of IVF.

  • Genetic testing for IVF involves extracting and removing cells from the outer layer of the embryo that gives rise to the placenta and umbilical cord. It is not representative of the inner layer of the embryo which forms the actual embryo, which gives birth to the baby.
  • Mosaic embryos, which are embryos with a mixture of genetically normal and abnormal cells, occur quite frequently and commonly in women undergoing IVF. Genetic testing often leads to the misdiagnosis and elimination of mosaic embryos, which have been shown to be able to give birth to a normal, healthy baby. Recently in 2020, a class action lawsuit was filed by Australian patients against a misdiagnosis by genetic IVF testing, which led to the elimination of their viable embryos and the consequent loss of the chance to become a parent.
  • There is scientific evidence that Mosaic embryos are able to self-correct, which increases the chances of a normal birth. This “self-correction” mechanism involves expelling genetically abnormal cells into the outer layer of the embryo, resulting in the placenta and umbilical cord.
  • Older women with low ovarian reserves have significantly fewer embryos during IVF. Therefore, excluding or rejecting mosaic embryos that could potentially give birth to a normal baby would in fact greatly reduce their chances of successful IVF. Some older women may not have more embryos to transfer after genetic testing.

Are there alternative methods to genetic IVF testing to prevent birth defects in older women?

Yes, there is a much cheaper alternative method than PGT-A (PGS). This is called the non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT), in which DNA from fetal cells in the pregnant woman’s bloodstream is extracted and tested for genetic abnormalities. However, the downside is that NIPT can only be performed after pregnancy, so the patient must be mentally and emotionally prepared to abort a genetically abnormal fetus. Additionally, ultrasound can also be used to some extent to detect Down syndrome, although the results are not as precise and conclusive as NIPT.

What is the Cost-Effectiveness of Genetic IVF Testing for Older Women?

In view of the uncertain results and the high costs of IVF treatment, it may be preferable for some patients with limited funds to reduce costs by not doing genetic tests, in order to save money for future IVF attempts. IVF treatment, as alternative, cheaper prenatal testing methods are available. After all, more than one IVF attempt is usually needed to achieve reproductive success, and it would be financially draining to do genetic testing for each cycle of IVF treatment. As mentioned earlier, since the risks of genetic abnormalities do not exceed 5% during most of the reproductive lifespan of women (20 to 45 years), it can be very unprofitable to use such an expensive procedure for all. older women undergoing IVF. In particular, the incidence of genetic abnormalities is generally less than 1.5% for women under 40, so the use of PGT-A would be unnecessary more than 98.5% of the time. Ultimately, it is up to patients with limited financial resources to decide whether it is worth taking a calculated risk of avoiding very expensive genetic testing, to get more IVF vaccines.

Can you clarify the principles and regulations of genetic testing for IVF in Singapore?

Singapore’s health policies allow genetic testing of IVF only for the traditional clinical treatment of patients with or carriers of known genetic diseases (PGT-M and PGT-SR). Routine genetic screening of older female IVF embryos (PGS or PGT-A), who are at increased risk for Down syndrome, is still not approved as general clinical treatment, but is limited to a strictly clinical trial. regulated in public hospitals. To participate in this clinical trial, women must be 35 years of age or older, or have suffered two repeated miscarriages, or have two unsuccessful IVF attempts. In addition, there are insufficient and questionable results from the ongoing clinical trial of genetic IVF testing in Singapore, which reportedly suffered from a high attrition rate of 72%.

Hihaishi C Bhaskar

hithaishicb@mmactiv.com


Source link

]]>
Can genetic tests for IVF potentially detect birth defects in a fertilized embryo? https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/can-genetic-tests-for-ivf-potentially-detect-birth-defects-in-a-fertilized-embryo/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 09:44:38 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/can-genetic-tests-for-ivf-potentially-detect-birth-defects-in-a-fertilized-embryo/ Is it worth doing genetic testing for IVF (PGS / PGT-A) to prevent birth defects in older women; In conversation with Dr Alexis Heng Boon Chin, Associate Professor, Peking University, China With an increasing trend towards late motherhood, many women in Asia and around the world are choosing to postpone motherhood while prioritizing their lifestyle […]]]>

Is it worth doing genetic testing for IVF (PGS / PGT-A) to prevent birth defects in older women; In conversation with Dr Alexis Heng Boon Chin, Associate Professor, Peking University, China

With an increasing trend towards late motherhood, many women in Asia and around the world are choosing to postpone motherhood while prioritizing their lifestyle and career goals. However, the chances of conceiving a baby with genetic (chromosomal) abnormalities increase with maternal age, the most common and well-known being Down syndrome. Globally, more than 90% of fetuses with Down syndrome are systematically aborted after a positive diagnosis by prenatal test. However, there are serious risks to the mental, physical and reproductive health of the patient to be aware of, when having an abortion of a fetus diagnosed with Down syndrome or other genetic abnormalities.

For older women undergoing assisted reproduction treatment, there is a way to avoid this abortion quagmire by genetic testing of IVF embryos before they are transferred to the uterus, a very expensive procedure known as preimplantation genetic testing – Aneuploidy (PGT-A) or preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). Therefore, the relevant question for older women undergoing assisted reproduction treatment is whether it is useful and cost effective to use expensive PGT-A (PGS) for the screening and exclusion of genetically embryos. abnormal, compared to standard prenatal testing techniques which are much cheaper.

Dr Alexis Heng Boon Chin, Associate Professor, Peking University, China share more ideas in this perspective with Biospectrum Asia.

What are the different types of genetic abnormalities that occur in older mothers?

Due to a lack of proper separation of chromosomes during egg development in older women, they are at a higher risk of genetically abnormal births.

The most common genetic defect in older mothers is Down syndrome, caused by an extra copy of chromosome 21. In addition, increasing maternal age is also associated with high risks of Edwards syndrome. (extra copy of chromosome 18), Patau syndrome (extra copy of chromosome 18). 13) and Klinefelter syndrome (extra X chromosome – 47, XXY). Of these, only babies with Down and Klinefelter syndromes usually survive to adulthood. Patau’s syndrome life expectancy is around 7-10 days, with 90% dying within the first year of life.

Likewise, the average lifespan for Edwards syndrome is 3 days to 2 weeks, with only 5% to 10% of affected infants surviving more than a year. Down syndrome is characterized by a substantial reduction in lifespan up to about 60 years, severe impairment of mental and physical development, as well as an increased predisposition to certain medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, diabetes. type II and Alzheimer’s disease (after the age of 40). In contrast, for Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY), there is only a very slight reduction in lifespan of about 2 years compared to the normal male population (46, XY). Although people with Klinefelter syndrome usually have normal intelligence, they suffer from infertility and have small underdeveloped male sex organs, poor motor coordination and weak muscles, reduced facial and body hair, breast growth. and low libido.

According to published medical statistics, the chances of conceiving a genetically abnormal baby for women in their late thirties, between the ages of 37 and 39, are approximately 0.8% to 1.2%. At age 40, the risk of genetic abnormalities increases to about 1.5%, then to about 4.8% at age 45.

Can genetic testing potentially harm IVF embryos?

Genetic testing for IVF involves drilling a hole in the shell of the embryo (Pellucide Zone) and extract cells from the embryo, which is potentially harmful and may interfere with its development. Experts pointed out that studies claiming that there were no harmful effects on embryos are often based on PGS of excellent quality, healthy and robust embryos rather than on more “delicate” embryos which could suffer more. If you only have one or two embryos, you might decide it’s not worth the risk. No matter how well trained the laboratory staff (embryologist) in this procedure, there is always a risk of human error. The busier the IVF lab, the greater the risk of human error, as lab staff are under pressure to complete procedures as quickly as possible.

What are the challenges associated with genetic testing for IVF?

There are several aspects to consider for genetic testing in the treatment of IVF.

  • Genetic IVF testing involves extracting and removing cells from the outer layer of the embryo that gives rise to the placenta and umbilical cord. It is not representative of the inner layer of the embryo which forms the actual embryo, which gives birth to the baby.
  • Mosaic embryos, which are embryos with a mixture of genetically normal and abnormal cells, occur quite frequently and commonly in women undergoing IVF. Genetic testing often leads to the misdiagnosis and elimination of mosaic embryos, which have been shown to be able to give birth to a normal, healthy baby. Recently, in 2020, a class action lawsuit was filed by Australian patients against a misdiagnosis by genetic IVF testing, which led to the disposal of their viable embryos and a consequent loss of chance of parenthood.
  • There is scientific evidence that Mosaic embryos are able to self-correct, which increases the chances of a normal birth. This “self-correction” mechanism involves expelling genetically abnormal cells into the outer layer of the embryo, resulting in the placenta and umbilical cord.
  • Older women with low ovarian reserves have significantly fewer embryos during IVF. Therefore, excluding or rejecting mosaic embryos that could potentially give birth to a normal baby would in fact greatly reduce their chances of successful IVF. Some older women may not have more embryos to transfer after genetic testing.

Are there alternative methods to genetic IVF testing to prevent birth defects in older women?

Yes, there is a much cheaper alternative method than PGT-A (PGS). This is called the non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT), in which DNA from fetal cells in the pregnant woman’s bloodstream is extracted and tested for genetic abnormalities. However, the downside is that NIPT can only be performed after pregnancy, so the patient must be mentally and emotionally prepared to abort a genetically abnormal fetus. Additionally, ultrasound can also be used to some extent to detect Down syndrome, although the results are not as precise and conclusive as NIPT.

What is the Cost-Effectiveness of Genetic IVF Testing for Older Women?

In view of the uncertain results and the high costs of IVF treatment, it may be preferable for some patients with limited funds to reduce costs by not doing genetic tests, in order to save money for future IVF attempts. IVF treatment, as cheaper alternative prenatal testing methods are available. After all, more than one IVF attempt is usually needed to achieve reproductive success, and it would be financially draining to do genetic testing for each cycle of IVF treatment. As mentioned earlier, since the chances of genetic abnormalities do not exceed 5% during most of the reproductive lifespan of women (20 to 45 years), it can be very unprofitable to use such an expensive procedure for all. older women undergoing IVF. In particular, the incidence of genetic abnormalities is generally less than 1.5% for women under 40, so the use of PGT-A would be unnecessary more than 98.5% of the time. Ultimately, it is up to patients with limited financial resources to decide whether it is worth taking a calculated risk of avoiding very expensive genetic testing, to get more IVF vaccines.

Can you clarify the principles and regulations of genetic testing for IVF in Singapore?

Singapore’s health policies allow genetic testing for IVF only for the traditional clinical treatment of patients with or carriers of known genetic diseases (PGT-M and PGT-SR). Routine genetic screening of older female IVF embryos (PGS or PGT-A), who are at increased risk for Down syndrome, is still not approved as general clinical treatment, but is limited to a strictly clinical trial. regulated in public hospitals. To participate in this clinical trial, women must be 35 years of age or older, or have suffered two repeated miscarriages, or have two unsuccessful IVF attempts. In addition, there are insufficient and questionable results from the ongoing clinical trial of genetic IVF testing in Singapore, which reportedly suffered from a high attrition rate of 72%.

Hihaishi C Bhaskar

hithaishicb@mmactiv.com


Source link

]]>
Family blames vax warrant for new mom’s death https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/family-blames-vax-warrant-for-new-moms-death/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 10:09:06 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/family-blames-vax-warrant-for-new-moms-death/ The family of a young Seattle mother is lashing out over vaccination warrants after her death from a rare blood clotting complication linked to the Johnson and Johnson COVID-19 vaccine. Washington state health officials released a statement saying that 37-year-old Jessica Berg Wilson died of “Thrombosis with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome,” also known as “Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia. vaccine-induced […]]]>

The family of a young Seattle mother is lashing out over vaccination warrants after her death from a rare blood clotting complication linked to the Johnson and Johnson COVID-19 vaccine.

Washington state health officials released a statement saying that 37-year-old Jessica Berg Wilson died of “Thrombosis with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome,” also known as “Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia. vaccine-induced immune system (VITT) “.

Berg Wilson is the fourth death from VITT linked to J & J’s single injection vaccination schedule.

In her obituary, her family described Jessica as “an exceptionally healthy and vibrant 37-year-old mother with no underlying health issues.” They noted her dedication to her children and the joy she felt as a mother to her two daughters, Bridget and Clara.

The family then accused the vaccination warrants of causing Jessica’s death. “In the last few weeks of his life,” the obituary read, “the world turned dark with tough vaccination mandates. Local and state governments were determined to take away his right to consult his wisdom and enjoy his freedom. “

Jessica, according to family members, was “vehemently opposed” to the vaccination, but was forced to do so. They did not specify which warrants required her to be vaccinated.

In the last few weeks of his life, however, the world darkened with tough vaccine mandates. Local and state governments were determined to take away his right to consult his wisdom and enjoy his freedom. She had fiercely opposed the vaccine, knowing that she was healthy and young, so she was not at risk of serious illness. In his mind, the known and unknown risks of the unproven vaccine were more of a threat. But, little by little, day after day, his freedom to choose has eroded. Her passion to become actively involved in the education of her children, which included being a roommate, was, once again, blocked by a government mandate. In the end, those who closed the doors and separated mothers from their children prevailed. It cost Jessica her life. It cost her children the loving embrace of their caring mother. And it cost her husband the sacred love of his devoted wife. It cost the Kingdom of God on earth a very special soul who just made his love felt in the hearts of so many. – Obituary of Jessica Berg Wilson

Washington State and King County health officials released a statement saying, “As with many drugs, the risk of serious adverse events is small, but not zero.” In the same statement, health officials also insisted that current vaccines, including the J&J version, are still considered safe. “In the past 30 days in King County, the risk of an unvaccinated person dying from COVID-19 was 57 times higher than a vaccinated person of the same age,” the statement said.

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The Understory: Befriend a Bat https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/the-understory-befriend-a-bat/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 09:27:43 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/the-understory-befriend-a-bat/ A small group from The Nature Place eagerly await the release of five large brown bats recently rehabilitated by PA Bat Rescue. At the end of August, standing in a clear field lit by the dim glow of the farewell sun, Debra Boyer raises her right arm above her head. Up there in the tucked […]]]>

A small group from The Nature Place eagerly await the release of five large brown bats recently rehabilitated by PA Bat Rescue.

At the end of August, standing in a clear field lit by the dim glow of the farewell sun, Debra Boyer raises her right arm above her head. Up there in the tucked folds of a hand towel and gently cupped in its gloved grip, a large, juvenile brown bat flutters around.

The puppy had been found abandoned on the ground about 5 weeks earlier, too thin and too weak to return to his dormitory. Malnutrition sets in quickly for baby bats like this; Based on the puppy’s depressed behavior when rescuers discovered them, they had already undergone at least 24 hours of separation from their mother.

It was in this terrible moment of atrophy that the puppy was taken to the Pennsylvania Bat Rescue for rehabilitation.

The Pennsylvania Bat Rescue is a small, nonprofit organization, operating out of the home of President and Founder Steph Stronsick. Every summer, from June to August, Stronsick’s converted bat nursery garage is inundated with orphaned baby bats.

It is an endless job for the bat surrogate as the puppies need to be fed every 2-3 hours. But once the puppies reach the age to fly – around 8-10 weeks old – Stronsick’s labor of love comes to a rewarding end with the release of his baby bats.

Perched at the end of her own rehabilitation journey, the young large brown bat pauses, breathing in the coolness of twilight. Collected from a distance, a small crowd of onlookers waits, holding their breath. Then, pushed by the twilight, the young bat takes off for the first time in the open.

They fly low at first, just above the crowd of “Oohs!” and “Ah! Before hovering toward the shady tree line, out of sight.

It was one of five juvenile bats released at The Nature Place in late August. With the care provided by the Pennsylvania Bat Rescue, they all survived one of the many dangers faced by native bats in Pennsylvania.

Bats are a group of mammals belonging to the order Chiroptera, from the Greek cheir meaning “hand” and pteron meaning “wing”. Fittingly, bats are the only mammal on Earth capable of true flight using skin webbed wings constructed from outstretched arm bones and hands; literally, bats fly clapping their hands!

Sadly, these unique inhabitants of the night sky have long been misunderstood, and even vilified, by people. People feared and persecuted bats because they are dirty, rabid carriers, bloodsuckers, “rats with wings”. But this harsh criticism is riddled with errors, overwhelming the bats with a slanderous reputation.

A PA Bat Rescue volunteer cradles a large brown bat she helped rehabilitate ahead of her outing to The Nature Place.

There are 1,400 species of bats, only three of which suck blood (and none of these bats live in the United States). No matter what their diet – be it blood, insects, nectar, or fruit – bats take hygiene seriously and spend a good part of their day grooming and grooming themselves. to clean up.

Contrary to popular belief, most bats do not carry rabies; in fact, less than 1% of bats worldwide carry the disease. You are much more likely to contract rabies from a dog or a raccoon than from a bat!

Additionally, bat disease cases that spread in human populations are often stimulated by human activities that destroy and encroach on bat habitat, forcing increased interactions between wild bat populations. , livestock and humans. We must recognize the repercussions of our own actions when we stress contact with wildlife and reconsider our role in preserving peaceful coexistence.

Bats, like most wildlife, prefer to be left alone and will avoid humans. When left on their own, bats are harmless and, more importantly, priceless threads intertwined in the web of earthly life.

Under the cover of night (while we sleep under the covers of our beds), the bats are busy. Insectivorous bats feast on flying bugs, many of which are agricultural pests. In fact, American farmers save an estimated $ 23 billion each year from the efforts of insectivorous bats, whose appetites reduce crop damage and limit the need for pesticides.

Nectar-feeding bats are responsible for pollinating a wide variety of plants, including those used commercially by people such as balsa wood, cloves, and agave – the plant whose juices are fermented and distilled to create tequila! Hi!

Fruit bats play a critical role in seed propagation, which is increasingly needed in tropical climates where deforestation threatens to destroy large swathes of rainforest. Bat droppings, rich in seeds from their fruit-rich diet, help replenish lost forests. In cleared areas, seeds left by bats can represent up to 95% of the first new growth.

Despite the valuable role bats play in natural ecosystems, bat populations around the world are struggling. In the United States, more than half of bat species are either in severe decline or classified as threatened.

The incentive for this fall is a perfect storm of stressors, including climate change, human persecution, the expansion of wind power, emerging diseases like white-nose syndrome and habitat destruction.

Mature forests are increasingly under siege as people cut down trees for profit or to make room for other land uses, from agriculture to residential development. But many North American bat species depend on these same forests for hunting and shelter. The Indiana bat, a federally threatened species, for example, sleeps in cavities created by loosely barked trees, like hickory shagbark, during the hottest months of the year.

Land conversion can destroy or fragment bat habitat, disrupting the migration routes and habitat corridors that bats use to access new areas in search of food, shelter or habitat. warmer climates.

Bats also use caves and reuse abandoned mines as daytime roosting habitat or as a hibernaculum – a winter shelter where bat colonies congregate when temperatures are dangerously freezing and insect prey is over. limited. Inappropriate tourism, vandalism, and the collapse or backfilling of abandoned mines ruin hibernacula, forcing bats out or even disturbing them in the dead of winter, with dire consequences.

Just as we are the source of bat conflicts, we also have the help of power.

Here in the Commonwealth, the Pennsylvania Bat Rescue field rehabilitation work is complemented by the habitat protection efforts of state agencies and organizations like Berks Nature.

When the Pennsylvania Game Commission (PGC) set out to understand the summer behavior of bats in Indiana, they fitted the bats with radio transmitters, which then took them to the Oley Hills in County of Berks. Here, nestled in a vast expanse of mature forest, herbaceous wet meadows, and sheltered networks of pristine watersheds, Indiana’s largest bat maternity colony in Pennsylvania has been discovered.

To support this sensitive Indiana bat population, PGC introduced Berks Nature to the landowners housing this colony. Their goal: to permanently protect this diverse mosaic of environments and ensure that the landscape endures as suitable habitat for the Indiana Bat in perpetuity, regardless of its federal status under the Species Act. endangered.

Children and adults alike were eager to get a closer look at these misunderstood mammals.

Between 2017 and 2018, after five years of persistence, two conservation easements covering 118 acres of wildlife habitat were established, securing in perpetuity the rich mosaic of mixed deciduous forests, wetlands and streams that bats of Oley’s Indiana call them home.

This natural refuge is more than Indiana bats. A population of Little Brown Bats, a species of special concern in Pennsylvania, also finds refuge here by mingling with the Indiana bat colony. Additionally, the federally threatened Marsh Turtle also takes shelter comfortably in the soggy meadows and wooded wetlands found here.

In these special easements, not only is development limited, but any action that could harm or significantly interfere with the ability of the land to support the Indiana Bat (or the Marsh Turtle) is prohibited.

As danger looms on all sides, securing a secure future for bats will require longer-term work and investment in conservation. Demonstrations of this commitment can already be seen across Pennsylvania.

In December 2020, the PGC and the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources began implementing a habitat conservation plan for the Indiana bat and the endangered northern bat. by the federal government on 3.8 million acres of public forest; and each year, the Pennsylvania Bat Rescue rehabilitates approximately 250 to 300 bats.

Now, after generations of misguided mistrust and fear, we have the opportunity to change the narrative, joining the bats not as fighters but as allies. More than ever, bats need our friendship.

Make friends with a bat today!

  • Install a bat house on your property! Visit the PA Bat Rescue website (https://pabatrescue.org/bat-houses) to download tips for building your own DIY bat house.
  • Incorporate native plant species into your landscaping. These plants will attract more insects than the exotic varieties, which bats love to eat. Once you open the insect buffet, the bats will line up to have fun!

Minimize the use of chemical pesticides. Remember, bats eat insects. When you poison annoying insects, you can also accidentally poison bats.


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Rochester man who seriously injured baby avoids jail https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/rochester-man-who-seriously-injured-baby-avoids-jail/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 21:01:50 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/rochester-man-who-seriously-injured-baby-avoids-jail/ Rochester, MN (KROC-AM News) – A Rochester man has avoided jail time for a first-degree assault conviction. Dylan Horsman, 23, was today given a suspended sentence of just over seven years in prison for seriously injuring his toddler son in November last year. Although he doesn’t have to serve jail time if he gets out […]]]>

Rochester, MN (KROC-AM News) – A Rochester man has avoided jail time for a first-degree assault conviction.

Dylan Horsman, 23, was today given a suspended sentence of just over seven years in prison for seriously injuring his toddler son in November last year. Although he doesn’t have to serve jail time if he gets out of trouble, Horsman was ordered to spend six months in jail and serve 10 years of probation. State guidelines recommend a sentence of seven years in prison for an accused with a clear criminal history, while the maximum recommended sentence for first-degree assault is 20 years in prison.

photo courtesy of Kraus-Anderson

Horsman previously entered into a plea deal that resulted in the dismissal of a third degree assault charge. He was charged in February following an investigation opened several months earlier after his two-month-old son ended up in hospital with multiple seizures.

The criminal complaint says medical tests determined the baby had injuries consistent with “shaken baby syndrome.” A doctor told investigators it was a life-threatening brain injury with the likelihood of some degree of permanent loss involving his nervous system.

Update: Man arrested for soliciting 11-year-old Rochester girl at the park

25 real crime scenes: what do they look like today?

Below, find out where 25 of history’s most infamous crimes took place – and what the locations are for today. (If they remained standing.)


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CBeebies reveals Leeds actor as new guest presenter https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/cbeebies-reveals-leeds-actor-as-new-guest-presenter/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 16:03:35 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/cbeebies-reveals-leeds-actor-as-new-guest-presenter/ CBeebies has announced that Leeds actor George Webster will become a guest presenter on his CBeebies House TV show. Webster, 20, with Down syndrome, appeared in a video for BBC Bitesize earlier this year, where he explored five Down syndrome myths for Learning Disabilities Week. The announcement was made earlier today on the CBeebies Grown-ups […]]]>

CBeebies has announced that Leeds actor George Webster will become a guest presenter on his CBeebies House TV show.

Webster, 20, with Down syndrome, appeared in a video for BBC Bitesize earlier this year, where he explored five Down syndrome myths for Learning Disabilities Week.

The announcement was made earlier today on the CBeebies Grown-ups Twitter account, where Webster said, “I am very happy to be a new presenter on CBeebies. The response today has been amazing and I’m so happy to have so much support. I am over the moon and delighted, it’s great!

News of his new role was all the rage on Twitter with the hashtag “Congratulations George” as users took to the social networking site to congratulate the actor.

Webster is also an Ambassador for the Mencap Learning Disabilities Charity, who also commented on his new role via Twitter: “We are delighted to see our fantastic Ambassador George Webster become a presenter on CBeebies. Congratulations, George from everyone here at Mencap! You are a brilliant role model so it’s great that you have the chance to introduce yourself to so many people.

The show airs from MediaCityUK in Salford.


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Life-changing surgery, the goal of the Evandale family | Examiner https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/life-changing-surgery-the-goal-of-the-evandale-family-examiner/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 18:30:00 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/life-changing-surgery-the-goal-of-the-evandale-family-examiner/ newsletters, editor’s selection list, For 14-month-old Charlie Taylor and his parents Max and Claude from Evandale, it’s been a roller coaster ride from the minute he was born last year in July. Charlie’s birth was traumatic and because of it he spent the first months of his life in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at […]]]>

newsletters, editor’s selection list,

For 14-month-old Charlie Taylor and his parents Max and Claude from Evandale, it’s been a roller coaster ride from the minute he was born last year in July. Charlie’s birth was traumatic and because of it he spent the first months of his life in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Launceston General Hospital. He was born with a rare disease that affected his eyes, which prompted his parents to ask many questions – but more importantly, why? Max and Claudia Taylor learned it may have been Mosaic Down syndrome, but tests later confirmed it wasn’t. After hours of family research and a referral to a specialist, which took eight months due to COVID restrictions, they got their answer. READ MORE: Sleeping Woman’s Lucky Escape After Fire Spotted At Home Charlie was diagnosed with blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus syndrome or BPES. This is a rare birth defect that means his eyelids are underdeveloped and cannot open as much as they should. The condition is caused by a mutation in the FOXL2 gene. As a result, he lacks the function of his eyelids and lacks muscles around his eyes. It also means that his tear ducts are not functioning properly. “I had never heard of this disease before, like most people, so it was a great learning experience,” Taylor said. “Mom has spent hours online researching what this means and being such a rare condition we wanted to be able to teach people about it.” In addition to affecting his eyesight, the condition can also lead to other problems in the future for Charlie. “When he turns around the corner, he doesn’t see anything, so he smashes into the wall,” Mr. Taylor said. “He looks up to see, which can lead to neck and spine problems. For the first five months, he didn’t move or move and the doctors thought maybe it was cerebral palsy, but he wasn’t. But he’s super active now and running like crazy, nothing can stop him. ” In order to correct his vision, Charlie must undergo surgery abroad, which will prove costly for the family. To help with this, a GoFundMe has been set up to raise funds. Specialty surgery to correct Charlie’s eyes is only available in Europe. There are techniques in Australia that are available, but they offer less desirable results and the possibility of continued surgeries needed throughout Charlie’s life. READ MORE: Huge win for companies with $ 70 million backing Surgery in Europe will involve a technique called the frontal muscle flap technique, which creates a vascular flap from the frontal muscle that is turned directly into the eyelid. This approach is more anatomical, avoids implants, but is more technically difficult. The family were told by one of Europe’s leading surgeons that the ideal age for Charlie’s surgery would be around two to three years old for the best possible outcome. “GoFundMe will cover airfare, insurance and accommodation, as we may have to stay for a while,” Taylor said. “It’s a two-part operation. So it will be five months before the second part of the operation can be performed. It will be too expensive to get home in between.” Sa nan lives in England and because of this. COVID, she didn’t I didn’t see her, she wanted to be there for the delivery, but unfortunately she couldn’t. She led the charge with the GoFundMe and did all she could and was a great support to us. “We all want the best for him and to give him the best possible start in life.” Charlie is one of only two known cases of BPES in the state. READ MORE: Tasmanian cove ‘chokes’, but little is being done Due to the rarity of the disease, Mr Taylor said there were plenty of questions from others about it. “I get a lot of people asking me, why does he look like this, what’s wrong with your baby’s eyes?” We know when he goes to school that he might be bullied for it . We just want the best for him. We are part of an online support group and have asked a lot of questions. The disease being so rare, the family wanted to know as much as they could. This included contacting other families who have known BPES for advice and information. “We asked a guy who had corrective surgery if he regretted having it,” Mr. Taylor said. state. “Charlie is a very happy little boy, and he’s at an age where he doesn’t realize he’s different from others. We just want him to have the same vision and the same abilities as the children of his. age.” The family is aiming to raise $ 70,000, with the fundraising page already having close to $ 10,000. “We just want the best life for our little Charlie.” To donate, visit the GoFundMe page. Our reporters work hard to provide local and up-to-date news to the community. Here’s how you can continue to access our trusted content: Follow us on Google News: The Examiner

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Climate opera arrives in New York with 21 tons of sand https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/climate-opera-arrives-in-new-york-with-21-tons-of-sand/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/climate-opera-arrives-in-new-york-with-21-tons-of-sand/ One rainy morning last week, a beach arrived outside the door of a Brooklyn theater. Or at least the raw materials for one: 21 tons of sand, packaged in 50-pound bags, of which 840. Pushed into the BAM Fisher on pushchair carts, they were unceremoniously dropped onto the tarpaulin-covered floor. from the theater with a […]]]>

One rainy morning last week, a beach arrived outside the door of a Brooklyn theater.

Or at least the raw materials for one: 21 tons of sand, packaged in 50-pound bags, of which 840. Pushed into the BAM Fisher on pushchair carts, they were unceremoniously dropped onto the tarpaulin-covered floor. from the theater with a thud.

Once opened and spread, the sand would form the basis of ‘Sun & Sea’, an installation-like opera that won first prize at the Venice Biennale in 2019 and has become a masterpiece in the era. of climate change. Neither didactic nor abstract, it is an insidiously enjoyable mosaic of consumption, globalization and ecological crisis. And its next stop is the Brooklyn Academy of Music, where it opens on Wednesday and runs through September 26.

“The way he delivers his ideas is totally surprising,” said David Binder, artistic director of BAM. “It disarms you and draws you in. This is not the way we are used to receiving work on the problems of our day – what we are all facing in this summer of fires and floods and what we have done to the planet. . “

For the creators of the work – Rugile Barzdziukaite, Vaiva Grainyte and Lina Lapelyte – the reception of “Sun & Sea”, only their second collaboration, was kind of a Cinderella story, as they put it in a recent one. video interview. But as much as it is a fairy tale, the work is the fruit of a friendship born in the Lithuanian city where they all grew up.

Barzdziukaite eventually became a director; Grainyte, writer; Lapelyte, a musical artist. Working together, they were drawn to opera, they said, because it provided “a meeting place” for their individual practices. As a trio, added Grainyte, “we can listen to each other and dive into this process without fighting or worrying about ego.”

Their first project was “Have a Good Day!”, Which traveled to New York for the Prototype festival in 2014. Like “Sun & Sea”, it touched on its subject – the thoughts of supermarket cashiers and the cycles of consumption – with a light touch. . The cast of 10 singers, all women to evoke a typical Lithuanian shop, shared stories that charmed until, in their accumulation, they tackled the nauseating excess of photographer Andreas Gursky on the same theme “99 Cent”.

“The idea was to have this zooming approach using micro-narratives,” Grainyte said, “but also to be aware that we also belong to this part of the buying and selling circles.”

It was important to the three creators that, although bitterly ironic, “Have a nice day!” was not controversial. “We tried to really avoid the ‘truth’ because it’s never black and white,” Lapelyte said. “It’s the same with ‘Sun & Sea’. When we talk about the climate crisis, it never comes with just one point of view. “

“Sun & Sea” is more ambitious: still subtle, intimate and bewitching, but sprawling in scale. From a shard of sand, Barzdziukaite, Grainyte and Lapelyte extract broad implications. The beach, after all, is an Anthropocene battleground that both embraces and challenges nature. It’s a destination worth traveling around the world, expelling tons of carbon, just to relax, but not without a heavy dose of sunscreen to prevent a burn, or worse.

The characters in Grainyte’s libretto, both frank and poetic, are overworked and over-traveled, both proud against the intrusion of technology into their lives and welcoming it. Their stories are told in the form of monologues and vignettes, interspersed with choirs of sinister serenity.

Often the characters are oblivious. “What a relief that the Great Barrier Reef has a restaurant and a hotel!” a woman sings. “We sat down to sip our piña coladas – included in the price! They taste better underwater, simply heaven! Her husband seems unaware that her exhaustion is not that different from that of the earth itself as he sighs melodically, “Suppressed negativity finds an unexpected outcome, like lava.” “

Some characters find beauty in the horrors of modern life. “The banana is born, ripens somewhere in South America, then it ends up on the other side of the planet, so far from home,” sings one of them. “It only existed to satisfy our hunger in a bite, to give us a feeling of happiness.”

Another, in the opera’s most unforgettable image, observes:

Pink dresses float:
Jellyfish dance in pairs –
With emerald colored bags,
Red bottles and bottle caps.

the sea has never been so colorful!

“We didn’t want to be too declarative,” Barzdziukaite said. “At one point, Vaiva removed all words that directly addressed ecological issues. The final work was about half of what has been written.

What they didn’t want was to give the impression that they were climate activists. “It would be unfair to say that,” Grainyte said. “If we were activists, we wouldn’t be creating this work that travels the world. (Production, like many in the performing arts, isn’t the most eco-friendly: for BAM’s presentation, all of that sand was trucked from VolleyballUSA in New Jersey to Brooklyn.)

But that does not mean that “Sun & Sea” avoids liability by design. Political art is a specter, and its creators are aware that they are grappling with heavy and urgent subjects; they just want their opera to “activate”, as Lapelyte puts it.

Beyond the text, music and visual presentation are essential for this purpose. The electronic score – earworm after earworm – provides minimal accompaniment to singers and was written to reflect ease of recreation.

“We wanted it to be pretty pop, to remind you of a song that you know well but can’t tell which one,” said Lapelyte. “And at the same time, it’s very reduced to very few notes, and it’s also repetitive like a pop song.”

The action, although largely improvised by volunteers who flesh out the cast, is handled obsessively by Barzdziukaite. Participants are requested to arrive with specific colors (mainly calming pastels). As the approximately one hour long opera is sung in a loop, they are asked not to appear to be playing, nor to greet the audience. For artists, the experience shouldn’t be any different from a trip to the beach.

“We use this documentary approach a lot in all aspects,” said Barzdziukaite. Observing spectators might notice how plastic casually fills the space; a pair of partially buried headphones, or abandoned toys, will be familiar sights.

In Venice, the public left “Sun & Sea” to be confronted with countless inexpensive souvenirs and towering cruise ships. At the end of the race, the city was flooded. Heavy rains will also have preceded the coin’s arrival in Brooklyn, with the storm carrying the remnants of Hurricane Ida killing more than 40 people in New York City and three neighboring states. None of this is lost on creators, who are wondering what it means to make subtle art in a world whose natural disasters increasingly have the heaviness of agitprop.

“I feel like I’m living in dissonance and wondering what’s next and how I should behave,” Grainyte said.

Those attending the BAM production might have similar questions. They won’t see tchotchkes swarming Venetian stores, but maybe on the way home they’ll take another look at the trash on the subway tracks or on the shelves of Midtown’s miniature Empire State Buildings.

If there’s any trash they shouldn’t worry about, it’s all that sand. After Sun & Sea closes, it will be vacuumed, disinfected and reused as a beach volleyball court, perhaps, or as a playground. But probably never again as an opera house.

Sun & Sea

Wednesday to September 26 at BAM Fisher, Brooklyn; bam.org.


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