Down syndrome diagnosis – Nova Scotia Down Syndrome Society http://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 06:08:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T230350.091.png Down syndrome diagnosis – Nova Scotia Down Syndrome Society http://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/ 32 32 Down Cheshire Syndrome Appears on Heart Breakfast https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/down-cheshire-syndrome-appears-on-heart-breakfast/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/down-cheshire-syndrome-appears-on-heart-breakfast/ A NORTHWICH-based Down syndrome charity appeared on Heart Breakfast as part of the Global’s Make Some Noise radio station’s charity mission. Down Syndrome Cheshire spoke to Jamie Theakston and Amanda Holden about the work she does to support more than 170 children with Down’s syndrome and their families in Cheshire. The mission of the association […]]]>

A NORTHWICH-based Down syndrome charity appeared on Heart Breakfast as part of the Global’s Make Some Noise radio station’s charity mission.

Down Syndrome Cheshire spoke to Jamie Theakston and Amanda Holden about the work she does to support more than 170 children with Down’s syndrome and their families in Cheshire.

The mission of the association is to educate parents and caregivers, raise awareness and support children to help them reach their potential.

It is one of 100 small charities supported by Global’s Make Some Noise in 2021, helping fund a new part-time speech-language pathologist for a year.

Lawrence Caygill, CEO of Down Syndrome Cheshire, told Heart listeners: “At Down Syndrome Cheshire, we help people with Down Syndrome live the lives they choose.

“There is no reason that people with Down’s syndrome cannot get married, have a job, travel the world and have an active social life, so we use early intervention and support to form the building blocks of these achievements. so that people with Down’s syndrome can reach their full potential. ”

Julie Duff, a mom and board chair, added, “One of the things we do at the association is help doctors understand the terminology they use when diagnosing a child. Down’s syndrome is really important.

“It’s not a ‘risk’ to have a child with Down’s syndrome, it’s a ‘chance’ that you have a child with Down’s syndrome.

“You don’t risk winning the lottery, you have a chance to win the lottery.”

Julie encouraged people to get in touch with the charity.

She said: “We went through this journey, we walked in their shoes, and we can really take a lot of the fear out of some of the emotions they might be feeling if they just had a prenatal diagnosis of the syndrome. from Down. ”

Tune in to Heart Breakfast with Jamie Theakston and Amanda Holden, weekdays 6.30-10am.

To donate £ 10, £ 20 or £ 30 to Global’s Make Some Noise, send HEART10, HEART20 or HEART30 respectively to 70766.

To learn more and get in touch with Down Cheshire Syndrome visit DScheshire.org.uk.


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Delegate Leaders from Congress and West Virginia Show Support at Annual Pro-Life Convention | VM News https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/delegate-leaders-from-congress-and-west-virginia-show-support-at-annual-pro-life-convention-vm-news/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/delegate-leaders-from-congress-and-west-virginia-show-support-at-annual-pro-life-convention-vm-news/ FAIRMONT, Va. (WV News) – About 80 state-elected leaders, pastors and life advocates gathered on Saturday for the annual state pro-life convention of West Virginians for Life, Inc .. Held at the Trinity Assembly of God in Fairmont, the convention highlighted successful families with disabled children, including Kurt Kondrich of Pittsburgh. A former Pittsburgh police […]]]>

FAIRMONT, Va. (WV News) – About 80 state-elected leaders, pastors and life advocates gathered on Saturday for the annual state pro-life convention of West Virginians for Life, Inc ..

Held at the Trinity Assembly of God in Fairmont, the convention highlighted successful families with disabled children, including Kurt Kondrich of Pittsburgh.

A former Pittsburgh police officer, Kondrich now advocates for Down syndrome awareness around the world with his 18-year-old daughter Chloe (who lives with Down syndrome and dreams of studying at Grove City College in Grove City, in Pennsylvania).

“We are very lucky,” said Kurt Kondrich. “Chloe is just a gift. She’s only brought love and joy to our family. She’s done more in 18 years than most people in their lifetime.”

Amanda Cunningham of Bridgeport started The Glory Days Co., a non-profit organization providing materials for parents of children with special needs. Cunningham’s 4-year-old daughter Aurora (affectionately known as “Rory”) lives with Down syndrome.

Cunningham told the organization she reluctantly relied on “Google and Grief,” before realizing that she had organized her life before Aurora with a planner and other tools.

“On the windows of my living room, I created a therapy tracking chart,” she said. “I needed a way to hold myself accountable for the lessons (the Birth Three program in West Virginia) was teaching me how to help my child.

“After six months of personal use, I had this voice that told me ‘if you need it, others do.’ All the pieces fell into place, and we’ve been in operation for four years and have sold over 2,000 planners worldwide. ”

The nonprofit also has a foundation to ensure that the material can be given to families at the time of birth or hospital diagnosis.

West Virginians for Life President Dr Wanda Franz is a former professor / child development psychologist at the University of West Virginia, but said her involvement in the state had “taught her so much. things I didn’t think I needed to know.

“And I got to know all of these wonderful people from all over West Virginia that I would never have met,” she said. “All of these pro-life people are wonderful, loving.”

Former national president of the right to life for 20 years, Franz said heads of state are now more supportive of pro-life legislation – possibly including the law to protect unborn children with Down’s syndrome. during this next legislative session.

U.S. Representative David McKinley is the grandfather of 16-year-old, deaf, blind and autistic Maxwell. He said the crowd on Saturday had built a support base for families with special needs.

“I’ve learned how special life is. He’s our guide,” McKinley said. “It opened my eyes. I think of the number of families across America who have children with special needs that we must continue to support.

“I believe life begins at conception – this is a core belief.”

A teen day camp, filled with games and educational lessons, was also run by delegates Riley Keaton, R-Roane and Caleb Hanna, R-Nicholas / Webster.

“We need to stand up and be a voice for those who don’t have the opportunity to express their own opinions,” Hanna said. “I think it’s so important that we have events like these.”

Keaton provides management during the summer camps, such as during the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston camp which attracted about 200 youth last summer, and provided case studies for the youth.

While online advocacy efforts have been stepped up due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Franz said the pandemic has not affected the passion or participation of advocates.


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Physical symptoms, causes and how to deal with them https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/physical-symptoms-causes-and-how-to-deal-with-them/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 09:06:16 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/physical-symptoms-causes-and-how-to-deal-with-them/ Depression is a common mental health problem that can cause physical and psychological symptoms. Possible physical symptoms include fatigue, more or less sleep than usual, and changes in appetite. These symptoms can occur as a result of changes in brain activity, hormone levels, or neurotransmitter levels. Treatments for depression can help relieve physical symptoms, as […]]]>

Depression is a common mental health problem that can cause physical and psychological symptoms. Possible physical symptoms include fatigue, more or less sleep than usual, and changes in appetite.

These symptoms can occur as a result of changes in brain activity, hormone levels, or neurotransmitter levels. Treatments for depression can help relieve physical symptoms, as well as psychological symptoms.

Read on to learn more about the physical symptoms of depression, including their causes and how to deal with them.

Depression is a mood disorder that affects the way a person thinks, feels, and behaves. This can cause them to feel sad, worthless, or numb for long periods of time. Typically, people feel a loss of interest or pleasure in the things they usually enjoy.

Emotional symptoms are well known, but depression is also associated with a range of physical symptoms. These include:

  • tiredness or fatigue
  • sleep more or less than usual
  • an increase or decrease in appetite
  • slow speech or movements
  • unexplained pain or headaches
  • loss of interest in sex, known as low libido
  • constipation or diarrhea

Fatigue or feelings of listlessness can also affect a person’s behavior. The person may spend less time than usual on personal care, which can lead to changes in their appearance. For example, they may lose or gain weight, or not shower or bathe as often as before.

However, not all people with depression will have obvious physical signs of the disease. Some affected people will continue with their daily activities without appearing ill.

Research suggests that the physical symptoms of depression are likely the result of multiple physiological changes occurring in the body.

Changes in appetite

A Study 2019 on the relationship between major depressive disorder (MDD) and eating behaviors found that eating disorders were more common in people with MDD than in those without. In women, researchers have also observed elevated levels of the hormone leptin, which reduces a person’s appetite.

The authors speculate that changes in appetite-regulating hormones may explain why depression can cause changes in appetite.

Sleep changes

A 2015 review suggests that changes in neurotransmitters and brain function may contribute to disruptions in REM sleep in people with depression.

For example, a study involving people with MDD found that during REM sleep, the limbic and paralimbic systems of the brain exhibited similar activity to that of an awake person.

This finding may explain why people with depression often wake up frequently during the night. However, sleep is complex, and researchers are still trying to understand how sleep and depression can affect each other.

Tired

A 2018 review notes that a lack of energy and fatigue may be linked to certain neurotransmitter systems that aren’t working as they should. Affected neurotransmitters can include norepinephrine or dopamine, but more research is needed to understand the mechanisms behind this dysfunction.

Certain emotional states and physical health problems can cause feelings similar to those that people with depression may have. These include:

Sadness or sorrow

It is normal to feel sadness or grief in response to difficult situations. Sometimes these emotional states can also cause physical symptoms, such as feeling tired.

However, sadness and grief are different from depression. Typically, mourning does not affect a person’s self-esteem. It can cause emotions in waves and involve a mixture of positive and negative feelings.

In contrast, depression often causes feelings of insignificance or self-hatred. Emotional changes tend to be consistent, affecting a person most of the time.

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

SAD, or major depression with seasonal tendency, is a condition that causes depressive symptoms in the fall and winter. People with SAD often feel tired, sleep more, and experience changes in their appetite. usually, a person with this disease wants to eat more food, especially carbohydrates.

Experts believe lower levels of sunlight cause SAD by triggering a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Hormonal changes

Certain conditions that affect female hormones can cause a bad mood. In some cases, the mood swings can be severe.

For example, people with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) may experience depression, irritability, and physical symptoms during 7-10 days before a period. Symptoms usually improve soon after your period starts.

PMS and menopause can also come with emotional and physical changes that can resemble depression.

Other conditions or medications

Several other conditions and medications can cause a bad mood, as well as physical symptoms that may seem similar to depression. Here are some examples :

Treatment for depression usually involves a combination of talk therapy and medication. Medicines, such as antidepressants, can reduce symptoms of depression. Talk therapy aims to tackle the underlying causes and help a person deal with their thoughts and feelings.

There are many styles of therapy. People are likely to find that they benefit more from some styles than others. One of the best-studied options is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), which aims to help a person understand the relationships between their thoughts, emotions, and behaviors.

For forms of depression that have a specific physiological cause, such as seasonal or hormonal changes, treatment may involve additional steps. For example, a person with SAD may benefit from light therapy and safe exposure to the sun.

The physical symptoms of depression can be difficult. They can make a person feel overwhelmed with everyday tasks, especially if they are feeling tired, loss of motivation, or in pain. Strategies that can help a person cope include:

  • Establish priorities: When someone has limited energy, it can be helpful to focus only on essential tasks. These can include personal hygiene practices, meal preparation, and pet care. A person might find it helpful to write down the most important tasks for each day and put the list on a bulletin board or on the refrigerator as a reminder.
  • Break down the tasks: People can make big jobs more manageable by breaking them down into small steps and focusing on one step at a time. For example, instead of trying to clean their house in one go, they can focus on cleaning a small area.
  • Setting a timer: If completing a task is difficult, a person may try to set a timer and focus on that task for a set amount of time, even if it is just a few minutes.
  • Batch cooking: Preparing multiple servings of a meal allows people to cool or freeze extra servings for later. It can help when a person doesn’t have a lot of energy or motivation to cook. Simple or slow-cooked dishes are useful because they require less effort and less dishes to clean.
  • Reduced cleaning: A few simple changes, such as placing a doormat on the front door or removing shoes before entering the house, can reduce the amount of cleaning required.
  • Ask for help : Social support is an important part of recovering from depression, both emotionally and physically. A person may be able to contact understanding friends, family, or neighbors for additional help.

Depression can make things desperate, but help is available. It is advisable to consult a doctor or mental health professional if any symptoms worry you or interfere with your daily tasks. These professionals will be able to make a diagnosis and talk to someone about treatment options.

You don’t have to wait for symptoms to get worse before seeking help. However, anyone who is having thoughts of suicide should seek help as soon as possible.

The physical symptoms of depression can include fatigue, changes in sleep, changes in appetite, and pain. Research suggests that these changes often occur due to levels of hormones and neurotransmitters, which are different in people with depression than in people without.

The physical effects of depression can make it harder to manage tasks, but treatment and other strategies can help a person cope.


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HHS recognizes Down Syndrome Awareness Month https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/hhs-recognizes-down-syndrome-awareness-month/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 12:20:48 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/hhs-recognizes-down-syndrome-awareness-month/ October 7, 2021 October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month, a time to learn about a disease that approximately 6,000 babies are born with each year in the United States. Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal disease diagnosed in the United States, occurring in approximately one in 700 babies and in people of all races […]]]>

October 7, 2021

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month, a time to learn about a disease that approximately 6,000 babies are born with each year in the United States.

Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal disease diagnosed in the United States, occurring in approximately one in 700 babies and in people of all races and economic levels. Usually babies are born with 46 chromosomes, 23 from each parent. People with Down syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21, which impacts the development of their bodies and brains.

There are three types of Down syndrome:

  • Down’s syndrome – every cell has three copies of chromosome 21. Most people have this type.
  • Translocation Down Syndrome – some or all of extra chromosome 21 is present, but it is attached to a different chromosome. This occurs in about 3% of people with Down syndrome.
  • Mosaic Down Syndrome – cells have a combination of the above two conditions. It affects about 2% of people with Down syndrome.

People with Down syndrome have a higher risk of breathing and hearing problems, eye problems, thyroid problems, and other medical problems.

Complications at birth, such as very low birth weight and heart defects, can lead to death in the first year. About 40% of children born with Down syndrome have congenital heart defects, but many of these conditions are now treatable.

People with Down syndrome have different levels of ability and can reach milestones later in life than is considered typical. Development delays do not mean they are unable to thrive.

“Before coming to work at HHSC, I had worked as an early intervention specialist with a local early childhood intervention program (ECI) and worked with children of different abilities,” said Erika Alvarez, liaison family ECI. “Helping families and witnessing their progress is truly heartwarming. I remember with emotion a mother who had a daughter with Down’s syndrome. She initially struggled to come to terms with her daughter’s diagnosis, but quickly became her daughter’s biggest advocate. The mom became very involved in the sessions, asked for resources and joined groups to surround herself with support.

Getting children with Down’s syndrome early on is essential to helping them develop to their full potential. This can include speech therapy, occupational therapy and physiotherapy, and other developmental services. Thanks to HHS, families can contact early childhood intervention services and Healthy Texas Babies programs and read the brochure Information on Down Syndrome for New Parents and Expecting Parents.

To learn more about Down syndrome, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Down Syndrome Facts webpage and the DSHS Down Syndrome Webpage.


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Is it a genetic condition? https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/is-it-a-genetic-condition/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 16:06:18 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/is-it-a-genetic-condition/ You inherit a lot of things from your parents, including your eye color and height. But not all genetic traits are good. An arrhythmia is an example of a genetic health problem. These can also be called hereditary or familial conditions. Although sudden cardiac death is extremely rare, affecting only 3 in 100,000 one person […]]]>

You inherit a lot of things from your parents, including your eye color and height. But not all genetic traits are good.

An arrhythmia is an example of a genetic health problem. These can also be called hereditary or familial conditions.

Although sudden cardiac death is extremely rare, affecting only 3 in 100,000 one person 2011 study found that about 70 percent of people under the age of 40 who died of sudden heart problems had underlying cardiac arrhythmias that they had inherited. This means that the problem with the heart’s ability to beat regularly has been passed on by one or both parents.

Sometimes the problem is limited to a malfunction of the electrical signals in the heart, the American Heart Association said. But in about a third of cases, arrhythmias may develop due to structural problems, or the way the heart is formed.

Your heart works using a complex electrical system that pulses through a detailed and delicate structure. Anytime any of these electrical signals are turned off, or any part of the structure is damaged or malformed, it can create a host of problems.

Experts Divide hereditary cardiac arrhythmias into two categories:

  • Primary electrical diseases. These are arrhythmias that develop from problems with electrical signals and not from structural problems in the heart.
  • Secondary arrhythmia syndromes. Arrhythmias like these will develop along with structural heart disease.

All hereditary cardiac arrhythmias are considered relatively rare conditions, but the most common types are:

Read on to learn more about the main types of hereditary heart arrhythmias.

Familial atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation, also known as AFib or AF, is the most common type of cardiac arrhythmia overall. This condition involves the upper chambers of the heart, called the right and left atria.

In AFib, the right and left atria shake and are not coordinated in pumping. This leads to compromised blood flow to the lower chambers of the heart or the right and left ventricles.

AFib can cause blood to collect in the atria. This increases the risk of developing blood clots, which are potentially fatal. A 2016 study estimated that up to a third of all strokes that occur in people aged 65 and over are due to AFib.

This condition can develop with age, but recent studies found that up to 30 percent of people with AFib inherited it. According to MedlinePlus Genetics, several genes have been linked to the development of familial AFib:

  • KCNQ1
  • KCNH2
  • ABCC9
  • LMNA
  • PRKAG2
  • RYR2
  • SCN5A

Many of these genes provide instructions as your heart trains on how its electrical channels are to be “wired”. If these channels are not wired correctly, ions, tiny electrically charged particles, will have trouble transmitting signals through the muscles in your heart.

Brugada syndrome

Brugada syndrome is another type of electrical problem in the heart that causes the ventricles to beat irregularly or too quickly. When this happens, your heart cannot effectively pump blood to the body.

This can cause serious difficulty as many of your organs depend on constant, strong blood flow to function properly. In severe cases, Brugada syndrome can cause ventricular fibrillation, a life-threatening irregular heartbeat.

A 2016 study have shown that at least 23 genes are associated with this syndrome. The the primaries are:

Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

This is a rare form of hereditary arrhythmia. People with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PCVT) will experience a very rapid heartbeat during physical activity, called ventricular tachycardia.

In CPVT, ventricular tachycardia usually occurs during some form of exercise. Sometimes you may notice it before the ventricular tachycardia occurs. You can do this by observing symptoms known as premature ventricular contractions (PCVs) during exercise.

With this type of genetic arrhythmia, the structure of the heart is usually not affected. It usually appears in people 40 years of age and younger.

Specific genes related to this condition are:

MedlinePlus Genetics says that RYR2 mutations account for about half of TVPC cases, while CASQ2 only causes about 5 percent. These two genes are responsible for making proteins that help maintain a regular heartbeat.

Long QT syndrome

In this condition, the muscles that cause the heart to contract or beat take too long to recharge between push-ups. This can disrupt the rhythm and regularity of your heartbeat, leading to other problems. Although long QT syndrome can be caused by drugs or other heart conditions, many can be inherited.

A 2016 study discovered that 15 genes are associated with this disease, but the most common are:

Most genes linked to familial arrhythmias are autosomal dominant, but some autosomal recessive disorders can also cause long QT syndrome. Genoa KCNQ1 and KCNE1 are linked to rarer types of long QT syndrome called Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndromes. In addition to hereditary arrhythmias, people with these conditions also suffer from deafness.

Short QT syndrome

This is a rare type of inherited arrhythmia. According to MedlinePlus Genetics, only about 70 cases of short QT syndrome have been diagnosed since it was recognized in 2000. Many other cases may exist, but they have not been diagnosed because this syndrome can occur without any symptoms.

With this condition, the heart muscle does not take enough time to charge between beats. It may not cause any symptoms in some people. But in others, it is the cause of sudden cardiac arrest or death.

Genoa related to this condition include:

Timothy’s Syndrome

With this rare disease, the heart has structural and electrical problems. Electrical problems come in the form of a long QT interval, or the time it takes for the heart to charge after each beat.

A long QT interval can lead to ventricular tachycardia, an often fatal arrhythmia. Ventricular tachycardia is the cause of death in approximately 80 percent of people with this syndrome.

Since this syndrome can also affect other parts of the body like the nervous system and the immune system, many people with Timothy’s syndrome die in childhood. It is an autosomal dominant syndrome, which means that only one copy of an altered gene can lead to it. But because few people with Timothy syndrome survive to adulthood, it is usually not passed from parent to child.

Instead, Timothy’s syndrome usually develops due to new mutations in the CACNA1C gene. This gene helps manage the flow of calcium ions through the heart muscles, affecting the regularity of your heartbeat.

Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

Another problem with the heart’s electrical system, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, occurs when an additional pathway for signals is formed in the heart. This means that electrical signals can jump over the atrioventricular node, the part of the heart that helps control your heart rate.

When the electrical signals jump over this node, your heart can beat extremely fast. This results in an arrhythmia called paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

In some cases, this syndrome has been passed down through families. But most people who develop this disease do not have a family history. Additionally, for many people with this syndrome, the cause is unknown. A few cases are the result of mutations in the PRKAG2 gene.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia

This rare disease is above all a structural problem. If you have this disease, a genetic mutation causes the muscle cells in your right ventricle, the lower chamber of the heart, to die. The disease mainly develops in people under the age of 35.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia usually develops without any symptoms. But it can still cause irregular heartbeats and even sudden death, especially during exercise. In later stages, this condition can also lead to heart failure.

About half of all cases of arrhythmogenic right ventricular heart failure are familial. Autosomal dominant inheritance from a parent is the most common. But it can also be passed on as an autosomal recessive gene from both parents. At least 13 genetic mutations have been linked to this disorder. PKP2 appears to be one of the most frequently affected genes.

The genes that cause this disease are responsible for forming desmosomes, or structures that connect muscle cells in the heart to each other. When these cells are not formed properly, the cells that make up the muscles in your heart cannot connect or communicate signals with each other.

Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation

There is a lot of uncertainty around the cause of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. Many people diagnosed with this disease have survived cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation and no other obvious cause. A genetic cause has been proposed in a 2016 study, but research is ongoing.

“Idiopathic” means that the origins of a condition are unknown. As genetic testing for other familial arrhythmias improves, it appears that cases of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation are decreasing.


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What is Havana Syndrome? The mysterious illness that could be caused by chemicals, panic, or something more sinister https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/what-is-havana-syndrome-the-mysterious-illness-that-could-be-caused-by-chemicals-panic-or-something-more-sinister/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 17:47:03 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/what-is-havana-syndrome-the-mysterious-illness-that-could-be-caused-by-chemicals-panic-or-something-more-sinister/ For many who suffer from this mysterious disease, it starts with a strange noise. The metallic whirring is soon followed by a series of strange symptoms: dizziness, nausea, and memory loss are the most common. For some, the symptoms are so debilitating and prolonged that they are no longer able to function. Hundreds of cases […]]]>

For many who suffer from this mysterious disease, it starts with a strange noise.

The metallic whirring is soon followed by a series of strange symptoms: dizziness, nausea, and memory loss are the most common.

For some, the symptoms are so debilitating and prolonged that they are no longer able to function.

Hundreds of cases have been reported across the world, and almost all patients have something in common.

They are diplomats, spies and military personnel working in American embassies abroad.

The United States is rushing to find out what, and potentially, could be causing Havana Syndrome.

But some experts believe that even though sufferers experience real symptoms, the cause lies in their own mind.

This is all we know about this mysterious disease.

When did it all start?

The first cases of the disease were reported in 2016 among US officials stationed in Cuba.

The U.S. Embassy in Havana had only been open for several months as the two countries continued closer ties after decades of hostility.

An American official told ProPublica in 2018 that for him it started with strange noises outside his Havana resort.

The first cases of Havana Syndrome were reported in 2016 by diplomats and relatives stationed in Cuba.(

Reuters: Alexandre Meneghini

)

“It was boring to the point of having to come into the house and close all the windows and doors and turn on the television,” he said.

“But I was never particularly worried about it. I was like, ‘I’m in a strange land, and the bugs here are making noise.'”

Although he never fell ill, his colleagues had also started to notice a strange cicada-like purr outside their homes.

As many of them fell ill, panic began to set in.

A total of 26 people associated with the United States Embassy contracted Havana Syndrome.

Doctors are unsure of the root cause, which makes it difficult to fully treat people with the condition.

The disease is unlike any other existing medical disorder, according to a 2020 report of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine.

What could possibly be going on here?

No one knows for sure what causes Havana Syndrome, but the disease is spreading.

Cases have been reported among US officials in China, Austria, Vietnam, India and Serbia.

Family members of U.S. personnel, including several children, have also reported symptoms.

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In 2019, two CIA agents claimed to have contracted Havana Syndrome in Australia.

Some believe it could be related to exposure to certain chemicals in pesticides, while others say it could be caused by an unknown infectious disease and even psychological issues.

Two sociologists insisted in 2018 that the disease was a mass illusion.

“What is most likely? »Robert Barthélemy and Robert Baloh requested in their research paper.

This is called mass psychogenic hysteria, and it occurs when the stress and fear surrounding an epidemic or unknown disease subconsciously causes people to start noticing symptoms in their bodies.

In 1944 for example, dozens of people in the US state of Illinois went to hospital with paralysis of the legs, cough, nausea, and vomiting.

They all believed they had been poisoned by a man known as Mad Gasser from Mattoon.

The problem was that such a person had never existed.

In 2018, a US government study recently obtained by BuzzFeed News found that eight of the earliest cases of Havana Syndrome in Cuba were triggered by crickets.

This would mean that even if they had real physical symptoms, the cause was psychological.

However, three years later, another US government report concluded that the cause appears to be “consistent with the effects of directed and pulsed radio frequency (RF) energy.”

Can noise really make you sick?

When Dr. James Lin, professor emeritus at the University of Illinois at Chicago, first heard of the disease, he thought it sounded surprisingly like his research on microwave energy.

According to Dr. Lin, the effects of this type of energy can occur instantly, and the technology used to transmit it is quite mobile.

“Everything you need is off the shelf, so you can make a system that’s pretty portable and can fit in the back of an SUV,” he told the ABC.

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While some experts have called the “science fiction” microwave theory, MRI scans performed on 40 people with Havana Syndrome showed tangible changes in their brains.

Their analyzes were “similar to those found in persistent concussion syndrome, but there was no evidence of blunt head trauma,” the researchers found.

Ultimately, the mysterious nature of Havana Syndrome only makes things worse for patients, according to Dr Jeffrey Staab, who served on the committee that released the government’s report.

“Regardless of the type of basic symptoms … the uncertainty of the diagnosis, the inconsistent or contradictory diagnoses they received from different places and different doctors they saw, the partial response to the treatments they received all add a level of psychosocial load, “he said.

So who could be behind Havana Syndrome?

The discovery of mysterious medical cases has strained the thaw in relations between the United States and Cuba.

The United States has drastically reduced staff at its Havana embassy and even expelled Cuban officials from the embassy in Washington.

The Cuban government has repeatedly denied that it was the cause of the disease or that it knew who was behind the alleged attacks.

A little boy looks outside a car driven by a woman as they drive past a Cuban flag
The Cuban government insists it is not behind the bizarre cases of Havana Syndrome. (

Reuters: Alexandre Meneghini

)

Another possible culprit has been named: the former enemy of the Cold War, Russia.

“[It] could be [Russia], but honestly, I can’t… I don’t want to suggest until we can draw more definitive conclusions that it might be, ”said CIA Director William Burns.

“But there are a number of possibilities.”

Moscow has repeatedly rejected accusations that it is involved in or “directed microwave weapons”.

“Such provocative and baseless speculations and fanciful assumptions cannot really be considered a serious matter to comment on,” the Russian Foreign Ministry said.

The only option left for the US government is to continue trying to solve the Havana Syndrome mystery and, hopefully, one day uncover its source.

“No one knows for sure,” Dr. Lin said.

“The only people who can tell us that and let us know for sure are who did it, and we don’t know who did it.”


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U.S. Supreme Court will not hear Missouri abortion bill case https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/u-s-supreme-court-will-not-hear-missouri-abortion-bill-case/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 20:34:12 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/u-s-supreme-court-will-not-hear-missouri-abortion-bill-case/ ST. LOUIS – The United States Supreme Court will not hear a case regarding the Missouri abortion heartbeat bill. The high court denied the Missouri attorney general’s request to hear the case. The bill is still pending before the 8th Circuit Court of Appeal. Headline: suspected California methamphetamine leader accused of sending drugs to Missouri […]]]>

ST. LOUIS – The United States Supreme Court will not hear a case regarding the Missouri abortion heartbeat bill. The high court denied the Missouri attorney general’s request to hear the case.

The bill is still pending before the 8th Circuit Court of Appeal.

The 2019 bill has been in a legal battle since a federal judge blocked it a day before it went into effect. The bill prohibits abortions after eight weeks or if the mother receives a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome.

A spokesperson for the Missouri attorney general’s office said, “We are optimistic that the court will rule in our favor. As the United States Supreme Court retains the ability to hear this case after the 8th Circuit review, we will continue to fight for life at all levels and in all courts.

Earlier this summer, a three-judge panel from the 8th Circuit Court of Appeal blocked the law, but after the June ruling the court made a rare decision and decided in July to hear the case again in front of all. the judges.

During the September hearing, all 11 members of a federal appeals court heard the case.

Under Missouri law passed in 2019, doctors who perform abortions after eight weeks could face five to 15 years in prison, but the woman who made the decision to have the abortion would not be charged.

Anyone who participates in an abortion after learning of a prenatal diagnosis of Down’s syndrome could be charged with civil penalties which may include the loss of a medical license.

Currently in Missouri, a woman can have an abortion for up to 22 weeks. The number of abortions in Missouri per year has declined dramatically over the years over the past decade. According to the Department of Health and Seniors’ Services, the state recorded 6,163 abortions in 2010, but only 46 in 2020.

Here is the list of abortions per year over the past decade:

2010 – 6 163
2011 – 5,772
2012 – 5,624
2013 – 5,416
2014 – 5,060
2015 – 4 765
2016 – 4,562
2017 – 3,903
2018 – 2,911
2019 – 1368
2020 – 46

Schmitt said he didn’t know when the court would rule, but is hoping for a quick ruling.

The hearing in St. Louis comes less than three months before the nation’s highest court is called upon to hear arguments for a Mississippi law that challenges the Roe v. Wade of 1973, which established abortion as a protected right.


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Times and bulbs they are changing – timesherald https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/times-and-bulbs-they-are-changing-timesherald/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 10:52:18 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/times-and-bulbs-they-are-changing-timesherald/ I knew when I was pregnant with him that Matthew would be born with an extra chromosome, which resulted in a diagnosis of Down syndrome. I was prepared for more obstacles that we would face, both in his birth and throughout his life. I was ready to take things a little slower this time around. […]]]>

I knew when I was pregnant with him that Matthew would be born with an extra chromosome, which resulted in a diagnosis of Down syndrome.

I was prepared for more obstacles that we would face, both in his birth and throughout his life. I was ready to take things a little slower this time around. With the older two, it seemed like I was always hitting the next milestone, looking for the next box I could tick. So with this little guy, I was prepared and happy to savor every step, to live life with him, rather than rushing around.

I was ready to take that extra step to make sure he reached his potential. And I was determined not to let Down syndrome define my son. I was prepared to make sure that didn’t happen.

Heck, I was prepared for a lot of things.

Except…

I was unprepared for Matthew’s extraordinary and often frightening / bizarre / unsettling ability to read minds / situations / changes. If that last sentence sounded like a panicked stream of consciousness, it was. Just thinking about it, my palms are sweating right now as I type.

Seriously, it’s unreal.

I learned early on that my son hates change. Part of it comes from me, part of it because of that extra chromosome. And with Matthew, that double stroke of genetics is a deadly combination.

Matthew’s adversity to change reached legendary status. And that scares the bravest (actually, just in me and my older kids Kaitlyn and Tommy).

The first time I realized how unfavorable he is to change was when the bulb in his bedroom blew out. But first, let me set the scene.

Since his father’s death, Matthew has insisted on sleeping with his TV on, as well as the light on his bedside table and on his desk. Sure, the light bulbs are only 40 watts, but damn it, it’s still as beautiful as daylight in his room. The only light he doesn’t need is his ceiling light. Peco loves us.

So one night the light bulb goes out. Since I’m always ready (see above), I have 40 watt bulbs on hand. Don’t worry, I told him, I’ll just change the bulb.

And that’s when my crash course on “Matthew’s Adversity to Change Even with Light Bulbs” began, which would then be followed by the revelation that Matthew has a sixth sense to go with that extra chromosome.

At first I thought Matthew was falling apart because he thought we had lost power. About 5 years ago, we lost power for 4 days during a snowstorm. Matthew was small, but he remembered it – so much so that every time he saw (saw) a Peco truck he was afraid (s) that a breakdown was in progress.

It took us most of the night to convince Matthew that the new bulb was a necessary evil if he wanted his room to be lit like Fenway Park for a night time game. By the time the collapse was over, he still wasn’t happy with the new bulb, but he somehow accepted that he would have to adjust if he wanted his room to be bright and cheerful. That night, I slept with one ear and one eye open, convinced my youngest would need another pep talk. But exhaustion, thank God, got the better of him (and me).

But make no mistake, that night I made a mental note to do a monthly bulb inspection when he was not at home – I will be changing the bulbs regularly to avoid this type of meltdown again. Damn, I thought, patting myself mentally on the back, I’m the smartest mom in the world….

And then it happened. About two weeks later, I inspected the bulbs, noticed one of them was taking on a darker shade, and quickly replaced it with a new one. Again patting my back… now I don’t have to worry about it coming out in the middle of the night.

The only thing I didn’t take into account was Matthew’s sixth sense.

As soon as I turned on the light, he asked me about it. Not thinking this was a big deal, I proudly explained my proactive (genius) actions and expected my son to thank me since I prevented a blackout in his room.

Instead, he kept saying “No, no. Switch. Switch. Bad dreams. ”Full Disclosure: Sure, Matthew usually speaks in full sentences, but when he panics his vocabulary is reduced to single syllable words.

Ugh. I was not prepared (see above, and laugh) for this reaction. So we spent another night talking to him about the lifespan of light bulbs and the strength of electricity.

Meanwhile, I was making another note. Never admit to having changed the bulb.

So, a few more weeks pass, I do my regular inspection and decide to turn off the bulbs. And now my palms are sweating. I go to my stock of bulbs and I have no more round, clear 40 watt bulbs. So I run to the store and the only 40 watt round bulbs are white. Or, I could get 40 watt clear bulbs, but they are shaped like typical bulbs. I buy both.

I put the transparent bulbs in the shape of a bulb. The shape was different from the ones I replaced, but that was the only difference.

Who knew this type of bulb cast a different shadow – I certainly didn’t. But then Matthew taught me the art of shadow casting.

He knew immediately that I had changed the bulbs and changed them for something different. Dear Lord, I thought. How long will this nightmare last? I first denied (yes, I know I shouldn’t lie to my kid, but desperate times call for desperate action). But, he knew I was lying. I gave up my soul and admitted my sin. I told him I would put in the old bulbs. But I put the white bulbs in the correct shape (without him seeing me do that). No, he said. The light is not good. He said, the light coming out is different. So I found the old bulbs and put them in (at least I was smart enough not to throw them away).

The next day I went to 3 different stores until I found the exact type of bulb that was currently in its lights. I bought a year of reserve and hid them in my room. I then made my best Matrix impression and slowly, methodically, being careful not to touch or displace the actual light, I changed the bulbs. It took me about 20 minutes to change two bulbs. Time well spent, I thought. There was no way Matthew would know.

So, it should be noted that at this stage, changing the bulb without being detected had become a matter of pride. Somehow, I likened Matthew’s ability to squeeze in that little action to Game 7 of the World Series. It was so important.

Guess who won the seventh game? It was not me.

After proudly completing the covert operation with Tom Cruise’s stealth and dexterity in Mission Impossible, I texted Kaitlyn, told her my “secret” and reminded her that this was information. classified and that she was not to breathe a word about the new bulbs after walking around the house.

Matthew and I walked into his room and smuggled the lights on (inside I wouldn’t betray myself with facial expressions). And then it happened….

He looked at me with his accusing blue eyes and said, “You changed the light bulbs. It was a statement, not a question. I wanted to scream. Seriously. But I kept my cool, and assured her with all the confidence in the world that I certainly had not changed her light bulbs. This time, I thought, I was engaging in this lie. I’m going to go to confession, but I won’t give in this time. And I held on.

Meanwhile, Kaitlyn and Tommy (who had now been made aware of the covert operation) stood behind Matthew, visibly stunned (their jaws dropped and their mouths open) that Matthew had detected these new blisters.

I have since resigned myself to the fact that my kids and I will be better off if, instead of focusing on covert ops, I commit to teaching my son how to accept and adapt to change. I have to teach him that things that are beyond our control can happen, and it’s up to us to figure out how to go with those changes. There are certain things in life that we simply have no control over, like the lifespan of light bulbs, and it’s up to us to get by.

Matthew is intuitive enough to understand that what I’m trying to teach him about embracing change and finding a way to embrace those changes will help him in the long run.

I’m also trying to teach him that using his “sixth sense” to help me fill out a Powerball ticket will help him in the long run as well.

Cheryl Kehoe Rodgers is a content writer for The Times Herald. Email him at crodgers@timesherald.com.


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Hundreds of people rally for reproductive rights in Pittsburgh in nationwide protest https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/hundreds-of-people-rally-for-reproductive-rights-in-pittsburgh-in-nationwide-protest/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 00:43:00 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/hundreds-of-people-rally-for-reproductive-rights-in-pittsburgh-in-nationwide-protest/ Abortion rights supporters filled half a dozen city blocks as they marched through downtown Pittsburgh on Saturday. The march was part of a national call to protect reproductive rights after Texas instituted the most restrictive abortion law in the country – and ahead of the next Supreme Court term, in which a conservative majority of […]]]>

Abortion rights supporters filled half a dozen city blocks as they marched through downtown Pittsburgh on Saturday. The march was part of a national call to protect reproductive rights after Texas instituted the most restrictive abortion law in the country – and ahead of the next Supreme Court term, in which a conservative majority of the judges could rule on the future of Roe v. Wade.

“We won’t back down… we won’t let the reality of Texas become the reality of this country,” Becky Foster, chair of the board of Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania, told a crowd of hundreds at the exterior of the City-County Building. .

Protesters gathered around noon for a rally before marching through the city center.

Kiley koscinski

Protesters march through downtown Liberty Avenue on Saturday, calling for the protection of reproductive rights. The march was among hundreds planned across the country.

According to the Women’s March, an organization that held annual protests during Donald Trump’s presidency, more than 600 rallies were planned in all 50 states Saturday.

The Pittsburgh Women’s March organized the local protest. Group leader Tracy Baton said she was stunned by the turnout. The overwhelming majority of the demonstrators were women.

“It shows how much the people of Pittsburgher care about the right to choose and [that] they are ready to set foot in the streets for that, ”she said.

Speakers focused heavily on eliminating elected officials who do not support reproductive rights.

Abortion is legal in Pennsylvania until approximately 24 weeks pregnant. Republicans-backed legislation pending in Harrisburg – but which would certainly meet a veto from Gov. Tom Wolf if passed – would ban the procedure after a doctor identifies a fetal heartbeat, usually around six weeks.

Another bill passed by State House in June would ban abortions requested only because of a diagnosis of Down’s syndrome.

“Before Texas we used to say ‘This could never happen’, but it has happened. And here we are,” said Chardae Jones, Mayor of Braddock. “It’s time to get the legislation out of our ovaries. It’s time to get rid of the legislation from our ovaries. it’s time to put our voices where we vote, it’s time to move forward, not back down.

US Representative Mike Doyle was one of two men who spoke to the crowd. “Women and single women should be making decisions about their bodies,” Doyle said. “In Congress, I’m happy to be an ally… and we’re going to scrap the Hyde Amendment so that a person’s income is not based on whether or not they have access to reproductive services.”

The Hyde Amendment prohibits the use of federal dollars for abortions except in cases of rape, incest or to save a woman’s life. Doyle has supported the amendment in the past, but co-sponsored a congressional bill that would repeal the Hyde Amendment in 2019.

A handful of other speakers encouraged those in attendance to call their representatives and encourage them to vote against bills against the right to abortion. Voter registration activists were on hand to register new voters and educate protesters on how they can contribute to voter registration efforts.

“Only by exercising our power at the polls can we achieve the change we need,” said Baton.

Other speakers shared their experience with abortions. Sydney Paige, medical student and volunteer for Pro Choice with Heart, spoke about her experience with sexual assault and homophobia.

“Our right to choose has been systematically taken away at every step. Our local, state and federal government continued to let down girls like me, ”she said.

Brenda Tate, chair of the Allegheny County Black Caucus, shared a childhood story about a neighbor who died after an abortion in an alleyway.

“For many years… I said I was going down the alley and death,” she said. ” I’m not coming back [to] the small street. You don’t go back to the alley. We’re not going back to the alley! she cried to a roaring crowd.

Laura Horowitz, a volunteer escort with pro-choice escorts from Pittsburgh, spoke about what anti-abortion activists yell at women when they enter clinics. Horowitz has escorted women from their cars to the clinic since the 1990s.

“If we weren’t there, there is a certainty that [anti-abortion-rights protesters] physically prevent patients and staff from entering the clinic, ”she said. But women are still subjected to verbal abuse and intimidation, she added.

The crowd descended on Grant Street and Liberty Avenue before returning to the City-County Building to disperse. Police have closed moving streets to help the march.

A small group continued to march in response to a rowdy after the majority of the crowd left.

The streets reopened shortly after 2 p.m.



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Woman with Down’s Syndrome Loses Legal Appeal in UK to Stop Abortions of Unborn Disabled Babies https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/woman-with-downs-syndrome-loses-legal-appeal-in-uk-to-stop-abortions-of-unborn-disabled-babies/ Sat, 02 Oct 2021 12:05:08 +0000 https://www.novascotiadownsyndromesociety.com/woman-with-downs-syndrome-loses-legal-appeal-in-uk-to-stop-abortions-of-unborn-disabled-babies/ A woman who challenged Britain’s abortion law which allows parents to terminate a pregnancy in cases of severe fetal abnormality until birth has lost her case. Speaking to Sky News ahead of the ruling, Heidi Crowter said if she lost in the High Court, she would appeal the ruling and continue to demand an end […]]]>

A woman who challenged Britain’s abortion law which allows parents to terminate a pregnancy in cases of severe fetal abnormality until birth has lost her case.

Speaking to Sky News ahead of the ruling, Heidi Crowter said if she lost in the High Court, she would appeal the ruling and continue to demand an end to “downright discriminatory” abortion laws.

Crowter, who married last year, said: “I don’t like having to justify my existence; it makes me feel like I’m not as valuable as someone else. It makes me feel like I shouldn’t be here. “

Abortions can take place during the first 24 weeks of pregnancy in England, Scotland and Wales. They must be approved by two doctors, who agree that having the baby would pose a greater risk to a woman’s physical or mental health than an interruption of pregnancy.

GAVIN NEWSOM SIGNS ABORTION PROTECTION BILLS

After 24 weeks, a woman can have an abortion if she is at risk of serious physical and mental injury, or if the fetus has a disability, including Down syndrome.

At the start of the judgment of two high-ranking judges, they wrote: “The issues which gave rise to this claim are very sensitive and sometimes controversial.

“They generate strong feelings on all sides of the debate, including sincere differences of views on ethical and religious issues.

“This tribunal cannot enter into these controversies; it must decide the case only according to the law.”

Crowter said she was “really upset” by the judgment, but added: “I will continue to fight.”

Speaking alongside her husband James Carter, she said: “I’m really upset that I didn’t win, but the fight is not over.

“The judges might not think it discriminates against me, the government might not think it discriminates against me, but I tell you I feel discriminated against and the verdict does not change what I and thousands of members do of the Down’s syndrome community.

“We face discrimination every day in schools, in the workplace and in society. Thanks to the verdict, the judges also confirmed the discrimination in the womb.

“It is a very sad day but I will continue to fight.”

ACLU MARKED FOR MODIFICATION OF ABORTION QUOTE FROM RUTH BADER GINSBURG, REPLACES “WOMAN” BY “PERSON”

The joint lawsuit was also brought by Mayor Lea-Wilson, the mother of a baby with Down’s syndrome.

Lea-Wilson said, “I am a mom and I love and appreciate both of my boys the same way.

“Today’s High Court judgment does indicate that my two sons are not considered equal in the eyes of the law and I am incredibly sad and disappointed that the court has chosen not to recognize the value and worth of people with Down syndrome, like my son. Aidan.

“People with Down’s Syndrome face discrimination in all aspects of life, with the COVID pandemic really highlighting the dangerous and deadly consequences it can have.

“This decision tolerates discrimination, cementing the belief in society that their lives are not as precious as the lives of people without disabilities.”

However, the British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) said women should have the right to “make tough decisions in heart-wrenching situations”.

BPAS CEO Clare Murphy said a change in the law “would force women to continue pregnancies with multiple abnormalities and deliver when the chances of survival are uncertain or unknown.”

She said the distinction between a fatal and non-fatal fetal anomaly is “not a clear white line” and that women should be able to make difficult decisions “against the background of significant medical complexities.”

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Murphy said the current law gives women time to understand the implications of a diagnosis and not to feel rushed into a decision.

“Conditions diagnosed later in pregnancy can be incredibly complex and very difficult for women and their partners,” she said. “Women are best placed in these circumstances to determine what is right for them in the context of their own lives. “

She said the right of women to terminate a pregnancy “must be seen as distinct” from a society that promotes equal rights for people with disabilities.

Click here to learn more about Sky News.


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